This Little Piggy Went to Market – In Thailand

Today was a day of incredible markets and unusual experiences. In Thailand like in most markets, they are not just a place to purchase food, goods and pick up desirables. It’s a place to commune, connect, and perpetuate community. This is more than evident in the markets we visited today.

First stop, the Maeklong Railway Market just outside of Bangkok proper in the Samut Sakhon Provence. There is no other market like this one in the world. The story goes that the market was originally on land that became too expensive for the merchants, so they decided to relocate to place that would be free, the railroad.

This market is set up on either side of the railroad tracks and when the train comes through (eight times a day) everyone has the clear the tracks and make room for the train. For shoppers this merely means moving out of the way. For the merchants this means, winding in their awnings, rolling back the carts that their wares are on (a foot or two) and then there are other items low enough to the ground that the train passes over them without harm. It’s a most unbelievable experience.

Once the train passes, awnings are rolled back out, crates with wares are rolled back into place and the shoppers are once again all a bustle. Everything you might need for creating a dish is there, vegetables of all sorts, as well as fruits, seasoning, fresh fish and seafood, meats of all kinds and young girls stringing the worship garland of marigold and jasmine that I purchased and wore around my neck.

The second stop was the Floating Market in Dameoen Saduek. We drove another half hour or so to arrive at the dock to take the long nose boat to the floating market. This is a canal that was dug by hand which is incredible to imagine considering the length of the canal. We were on a pretty fast moving boat for at least twenty minutes.

Two of the elements of both of these markets are the incredible heat and humidity and this is true despite the fact that we began our journey at 7:00 to avoid the height of the heat. Despite that the heat was quite intense a somewhat draining. Thank goodness for the air-conditioned tour bus. The other element consists of droves of people, locals shopping and tourist from all countless far away lands. The largest groups are tourists are from China.

Last stop wasn’t your usual market; it was small and was actually a cocoanut processing compound. At this stop we were taught how the cocoanuts grow, the many ways it’s processed for oil, to make sugar, syrup, soap, oil, milk, juice and of course we were able to purchase, fresh, young coconuts to drink. Most Thai food includes some element of the coconut. As a special treat for us, our wonderful tour guide, Nok, purchased some plantain bananas that were rolled in cocoanut shavings and deep-fried. It was very delicious.

At this stop we were also able to go inside of a traditional Thai home. Made of teak wood, these homes are on stilts to raise the house to avoid flood, to house the water catching device and because having the house high off the ground, makes for a cooler home.

Inside each home is a shrine to the Buddha, in varying degrees of elaborateness.   There are also shrines outside of every home and business. Each home has two shrines, a shrine to the land elements (soil, air, water, plants, all botanicals) and a shrine to the ancestors. The ancestors have their own home outside the house because they are not allowed to live inside the home; they have their own home.

The land shrine is on a single pedestal and the ancestor shrine is typically on six legs. There are offering made to the shrine daily of acknowledgment and prayers, incense burned, food offered and worship garlands made of flowers like the one I purchased. I wore mine all day long and was just enchanted by the fragrant aroma of the marigold and jasmine. I can only imagine the ancestors loving this fragrance too. It’s jasmine that is the primary essence in the Anu Essentials Sea Scape Perfume, a fragrance that has easy access to my heart.

Also, this home, market had many animals, monkeys, birds, roosters, dogs and a cacophony of insects, which made for quite the sound system.  We finally arrived back to the hotel and just as I was about to prepare for a nap, veteran globe trotter Kay called and asked me to go with her to an antique mall.  That would take a whole other blog post if I could even find the words to describe one incredibly fabulous store with antiques that are just mind blogging. That’s another post for another day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally there was a delicious dinner with my two veteran, globetrotting friends who planned this incredible trip, Kay and Patricia at the night market on the river front.  Yes indeed, the market remains a hub for people to come together, to be together, to live and enjoy life.

It Hurt So Good – Thai Massage

After 17 hours of  flying time to arrive in Bangkok, Thailand today, I couldn’t wait to have one of those amazing Thai massages.  It hurt so good, I felt I had to share this incredible treat with you.  Thailand is called the land of the Buddha. But another thing that Thailand is quite famous for is, Thai Massage. Thai Massage has a profound healing affect on the body, due to the many levels of the body that this massage technique is able to access.

Our tour guide informed us that there is no hip or knee replacement surgery in Thailand due to great affect Thai massage has on the body. She mentioned that Thai massage is also the reason why senior citizens of Thailand have no problem squatting to use their traditional, hole in the ground kind of toilet. BTW, squatting is the natural position to relieve one’s bowels. It is a toddler’s tendency to assume the squat position before they are taught to sit on a potty. Indigenous people around the planet, squat to relieve themselves. Squatting prevents straining, undue pressure on the legs and thereby prevents hemorrhoids.

Thai massage addresses meridians also known as channels along the body. When having Thai massage some of the points along the channels are extremely tender when pressed by the therapist, due to blockages. It’s the kind of tenderness that can cause you to groan in pain. Yet, by the second, or third round of adding pressure to that same area, the tenderness subsides, indicating the blockage has been cleared and you don’t have to consider knocking out the therapist for causing you such discomfort.

The massage therapist uses fingers and thumbs for small areas, forearms and elbows for medium size muscles and the foot and knee for larger areas of the body like hamstrings and gluteus maximus. Actually, they use their whole bodies to massage you. They pull and stretch you like you’re a rubber doll. It’s quite incredible. It’s the one massage modality that doesn’t require you to remove your clothes.

One of the ladies I’m traveling with has been to Thailand so many times, the only thing she’s interested in buying this time around are massage therapy sessions. On our first day here she had a four-hour massage. Another friend of mine who lived in other parts of Asia and the Emirates, used to also travel to Thailand just for the massages. Not only are the massages great, they cost under $10.00 US dollars per hour. Often those in the know travel to Thailand just have massages all day long and or for days in a row.

These massage parlors are ubiquitous in Thailand as everyone here receives these services.  I was the only foreigner in the little spot I went to today.  The parlor I visited had approximately 7 “stations” in one large room.  All of the massages are done on a mat, on the floor and it was very clean.  I had to chuckle when near the end of my session one elder therapist asked where I was from.  I said, New York.  She couldn’t understand me even after I repeated it, so my therapist whispered to her, “New York, she Negro American.”  I never felt so good to be referred to as a Negro before in my life.  Somehow the way she shared my heritage, touched my heart and caused a sweet internal laugh.

You don’t have to travel all the way to Thailand for Thai massage, especially if you live in New York or California, but if you can, it will be worth the trip, because you will get the real deal, at a price that will make you feel guilty. It’s the best guilty pleasure of them all.